Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 edge benchmarked (the Exynos flavor)

Peter, 22 February, 2016

The Samsung Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 edge splashed down at the MWC and while their cameras and screens are the biggest improvements, they come with brand new chipsets, which we promptly benchmarked.

We tested both the S7 and S7 edge and the difference in form factor didn't make a difference in performance, so we united their scores.

Note that this is the Exynos 8890 chipset, which is built on a 14nm process and features a total of eight custom Samsung cores - four small and four big ones. They work in tandem with Mali-T880 GPU to deliver awesome performance.

AnTuTu 6 shows a sizeable jump in performance over the old guard, the S6 edge+.

AnTuTu 6

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S7 / S7 edge
    114250
  • Huawei Mate 8
    91609
  • Huawei Nexus 6P
    89345
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+
    83167
  • LG V10
    67547
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (S652)
    64591

Samsung broke away from the stock ARM Cortex cores, but comparing them to the Huawei Mate 8 (Kirin 950, 4x A72 + 4x A53) the two seem on par (we don't have single-core scores for the Mate 8 though).

GeekBench 3 (multi-core)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S7 / S7 edge
    6395
  • Huawei Mate 8
    6323
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+
    5158
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (S652)
    4759
  • Huawei Nexus 6P
    4539
  • Sony Xperia Z5 Premium
    4194
  • LG V10
    3607

GeekBench 3 (single-core)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S7 / S7 edge
    2108
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (S652)
    1466

The GPU proved strong at a fixed 1080p resolution, games can even run at native QHD resolution if they keep effects at a sane setting.

Note that the Sony Xperia Z5 Premium seems to top the Galaxy S7 in onscreen tests despite its 4K screen, but that's only because it runs most apps at 1080p.

Update Feb 25: The GFX 3.0 Manhattan (offscreen) score below has been updated as previously we had posted an incorrect, lower score.

GFX 3.0 Manhattan (1080p offscreen)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S7 / S7 edge
    38
  • Sony Xperia Z5 Premium
    26
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+
    25
  • Huawei Nexus 6P
    25
  • Huawei Mate 8
    18
  • LG V10
    15
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (S652)
    13

GFX 3.0 Manhattan (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Sony Xperia Z5 Premium
    27
  • Samsung Galaxy S7 / S7 edge
    25
  • Huawei Mate 8
    18
  • Huawei Nexus 6P
    17
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+
    15
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (S652)
    13
  • LG V10
    9.5

GFX 3.1 Manhattan (1080p offscreen)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S7 / S7 edge
    26
  • Sony Xperia Z5 Premium
    18
  • Huawei Nexus 6P
    17
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+
    15
  • LG V10
    10
  • Huawei Mate 8
    10
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (S652)
    9.3

GFX 3.1 Manhattan (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Sony Xperia Z5 Premium
    19
  • Samsung Galaxy S7 / S7 edge
    15
  • Huawei Mate 8
    11
  • Huawei Nexus 6P
    11
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (S652)
    9.1
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+
    6.6
  • LG V10
    5.7

Basemark X

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+
    26333
  • Samsung Galaxy S7 / S7 edge
    24862
  • Sony Xperia Z5 Premium
    24281
  • Huawei Nexus 6P
    22825
  • Huawei Mate 8
    15593
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (S652)
    15290
  • LG V10
    15161

The Samsung Galaxy S7 / S7 edge got its revenge in the Basemark ES 3.1 test though with a massive advantage.

Basemark ES 3.1 / Metal

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S7 / S7 edge
    732
  • Huawei Nexus 6P
    504
  • Sony Xperia Z5 Premium
    482
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+
    348
  • Huawei Mate 8
    311
  • LG V10
    297
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (S652)
    253

Related

Reader comments

  • SENiya

I dont think xperia z5 ran with 4k resolution for the benchmark

Sorry about that, I meant that 4K would leave less resources behind to do the benchmarks as more power was being used to power the display. I realize I could (and should) have worded that better.

  • AnonD-494168

no chance

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