LG G4 review: Sharp and shooter

Sharp and shooter

GSMArena team, 22 May 2015.

Performance

LG made a somewhat controversial decision to not use the top chipset for its flagship, going for the Snapdragon 808 over the 810 found in the LG G Flex2.

One major difference is in the big cluster of the processor - it uses two Cortex-A57 cores instead of four. It still has four Cortex-A53 cores in the LITTLE cluster. The other is in the GPU, the 808 has Adreno 418, which will have a tougher time rendering at QHD.

Still, as we saw with the Snapdragon 810 achieving maximum performance is a matter of temperature. For short, bursty jobs the 810 will be faster, but sustained usage quickly degrades performance.

LG G4 Review

Let's start with the processor. Basemark OS 2.0 shows little difference in single-threaded performance, modern flagships just let the Cortex-A57 do its job.

Basemark OS 2.0 (single-core)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    6306
  • LG G4
    5871
  • LG G Flex2
    5597
  • LG G3
    5396
  • HTC One M9
    4688

Going to multiple cores, shows that the Snapdragon 808 is very competitive with the 810 and Geekbench 3 confirms it. Unfortunately, this has more to do with how inefficient Snapdragon 810 is. The Galaxy S6 chipset is built on a smaller process, which produces less heat and the performance advantage is there for everyone to see.

Basemark OS 2.0 (multi-core)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    26799
  • LG G Flex2
    18856
  • HTC One M9
    18047
  • LG G4
    17739
  • LG G3
    16485

GeekBench 3

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    5215
  • HTC One M9
    3761
  • LG G Flex2
    3604
  • LG G4
    3509
  • Sony Xperia Z3
    2860
  • LG G3
    2370

Overall performance measured by AnTuTu again shows a fairly even performance between both Qualcomm chipsets. Basemark OS 2.0 even puts the LG G4 and Galaxy S6 on fairly even ground, though AnTuTu 5 strongly disagrees.

AnTuTu 5

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    69396
  • HTC One M9
    51427
  • LG G4
    49295
  • LG G Flex2
    47680
  • LG G3
    42038
  • Sony Xperia Z3
    40393

Basemark OS 2.0

Higher is better

  • LG G Flex2
    1726
  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    1674
  • LG G4
    1584
  • HTC One M9
    1365
  • LG G3
    1189

When it comes to graphics, the simpler GFX Benchmark 2.7 shows a sizeable disadvantage compared to the Adreno 430 found in the higher-up Snapdragon. Which is especially visible in the on-screen test - Adreno 418 is faster than the 330 used in the LG G3, but not by much.

GFX 2.7 T-Rex (1080p offscreen)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    59
  • HTC One M9
    49
  • LG G Flex2
    49
  • LG G4
    34.5
  • Sony Xperia Z3
    27.7
  • LG G3
    26

GFX 2.7 T-Rex (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • HTC One M9
    50
  • LG G Flex2
    48
  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    38
  • Sony Xperia Z3
    29.3
  • LG G4
    24.7
  • LG G3
    20

The more complicated GFX 3.0 test shows an even smaller difference between the LG G4 and the G3. A phone with a QHD screen really needed a bigger GPU update. Here the Galaxy S6 has a noticeable lead. When looking at on-screen results keep in mind the difference in resolution - the G Flex2, One M9 and Xperia Z3 render at only 1080p.

GFX 3.0 Manhattan (1080p offscreen)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    24
  • HTC One M9
    23
  • LG G Flex2
    22
  • LG G4
    14.8
  • Sony Xperia Z3
    12
  • LG G3
    11

GFX 3.0 Manhattan (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • HTC One M9
    24
  • LG G Flex2
    22
  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    14
  • Sony Xperia Z3
    12.7
  • LG G4
    9.4
  • LG G3
    7.7

Basemark X shows a healthy improvement over the G3, though the LG G4 is still well behind the other QHD phone in the mix, the Galaxy S6.

Basemark X

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    27169
  • HTC One M9
    19848
  • LG G Flex2
    19360
  • LG G4
    15040
  • Sony Xperia Z3
    12637
  • LG G3
    10580

LG dropped their customized browser and rely on Chrome, which proves to be a wise decision as far as JavaScript performance is concerned - you get close to double the performance of a Lollipop-running LG G3, even the Galaxy S6 can't get ahead.

Kraken 1.1

Lower is better

  • LG G4
    4085
  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    4154
  • LG G Flex2
    4621
  • HTC One M9
    5500
  • Sony Xperia Z3
    6355
  • LG G3
    7632

When it comes to rendering a page at QHD resolution things aren't as fast though. The LG G4 still handily beats its predecessor, but the Samsung pulls ahead.

BrowserMark 2.1

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S6
    2718
  • LG G Flex2
    2086
  • LG G4
    1990
  • HTC One M9
    1681
  • Sony Xperia Z3
    1533
  • LG G3
    1453

LG made the right call using the Snapdragon 808 over the 810 as far as general performance and web browsing are concerned. Both chipsets are essentially equals for sustained performance. The one problem - and it's a big one - is that the GPU just doesn't have enough oomph for QHD gaming. It's an improvement over the previous phone, but not a very big one and certainly not one worthy of a 2015 flagship.

Reader comments

Hopefully my used LG G4 H815 will last longer ever since I bought it on July 15 to replace/substitute my used Nokia N86 white, and also to be fitted companion for my LG V30+ ThinQ Raspberry Rose!! That's why I put this word on my LG G4 locked scree...

  • Anonymous

Maybe you have bootloop problem?

  • Adewumi

Pls my husband send me LG G4 H812 phone I only use it for only 2days and ever since then it will just put on the screen LG as if is booting and it will not display anything.please what should I do with it