LG V40 ThinQ review

GSMArena team, 16 November 2018.

User interface

The V40 ThinQ boots Android 8.1 Oreo with LG's in-house launcher on top. Sadly, gone are the days of the V20 which was at the time the first phone to launch on Nougat. Android P will certainly come, sooner or later.

LG V40 ThinQ review

Always-on display is present on the V40, naturally, and you can have one out six designs in total, notifications from all apps can be shown, and you can also set up a period when the feature will be turned off - pretty much the usual AOD stuff.

Always on display - LG V40 ThinQ review Always on display - LG V40 ThinQ review Always on display - LG V40 ThinQ review Always on display - LG V40 ThinQ review Always on display - LG V40 ThinQ review
Always on display

LG likes to call the area around the notch New Second Screen and claims this is an enhanced version of the second screen from the V10 and V20. No matter the name, the notch is there and it splits the top of the screen. It fits the usual stuff - notification icons, status items, the clock and network bars. Unlike most other makers, LG gives you the option to embrace the notch and assign custom colors to the horns and pick one of two different corner radiuses.

New Second Screen - LG V40 ThinQ review New Second Screen - LG V40 ThinQ review New Second Screen - LG V40 ThinQ review New Second Screen - LG V40 ThinQ review
New Second Screen

The V40 ThinQ's lockscreen is virtually identical to the G7's. You get two shortcuts in the bottom corners by default - to the dialer and the camera. You can, however, have up to 5 shortcuts there, to apps of your own choosing.

You have multiple options for a secure unlock - the usual PIN, pattern or password, fingerprint (the sensor is always on), face (fast but less secure, or slow but more secure), and LG's own Knock Code. The nice thing is that these work simultaneously, and the phone will unlock with the first successful option.

Lockscreen - LG V40 ThinQ review ...and security settings - LG V40 ThinQ review ...and security settings - LG V40 ThinQ review ...and security settings - LG V40 ThinQ review ...and security settings - LG V40 ThinQ review ...and security settings - LG V40 ThinQ review
Lockscreen • ...and security settings

Past the lockscreen is the homescreen which lacks an app drawer by default. You can, however, switch back to the stock Android two-tiered arrangement.

Smart Bulletin is your leftmost pane with various widgets to help you organize your day.

Homescreen - LG V40 ThinQ review Homescreen - LG V40 ThinQ review Smart Bulletin - LG V40 ThinQ review Smart Bulletin - LG V40 ThinQ review Types of Homes - LG V40 ThinQ review
Homescreen • Homescreen • Smart Bulletin • Smart Bulletin • Types of Homes

The task switcher has a 'clear all' button, plus a pin you can tap on each app if you want it to remain after you've killed the rest. That's different from screen pinning (needs to be enabled in settings), where you can pin a single app to stay on the display regardless of the user's attempts to tap away from it.

There's, of course, split-screen multitasking. In split screen view, the Home button shows your homescreen but does not dismiss the apps - the app switcher button shows the split screen icon and double tapping it brings back the two. This is great since normally you can only pick apps from the app switcher rolodex for split screen use, but in this state, any app you launch from the homescreen goes straight into split screen mode.

QSlide, LG's floating app implementation, is still available in some places - the Phone, and the video player. But those are the exception rather than the rule.

The system wide search (swipe down anywhere on your homescreen) sifts through your apps, contacts, and settings for the search term you input. You can specify where exactly it looks into, so it doesn't have access to sensitive apps like instant messengers (or whatever it is that you prefer to stay private).

Task switcher - LG V40 ThinQ review Multi-window - LG V40 ThinQ review Screen pinning - LG V40 ThinQ review Qslide - LG V40 ThinQ review Universal search - LG V40 ThinQ review
Task switcher • Multi-window • Screen pinning • Qslide • Universal search

The notification area is nothing out of the ordinary and features a single row of quick toggles plus a brightness slider on the furst pull, more toggles on the second.

The notification area - LG V40 ThinQ review Quick toggles galore - LG V40 ThinQ review
The notification area • Quick toggles galore

Finally, there is a dedicated hardware key to summon the Google Assistant - single press does that for you. A double press, on the other hand, will launch Google Lens.

Synthetic benchmarks

The V40 ThinQ is powered by the Snapdragon 845 chipset like every other high-end phone from a company that doesn't make their own chips. It's got 6GB of RAM and comes in storage tiers of 64GB and 128GB, though the latter may not be available everywhere.

LG V40 ThinQ review

We ran the usual set of benchmarks, and the numbers don't really bring major surprises. The single-core CPU testing in GeekBench returned results typical of Snapdragon 845 phones, while the Mate 20 Pro with its brand new Kirin 980 and the Galaxy S9+ in Exynos trim put out much higher scores.

GeekBench 4.1 (single-core)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S9+
    3771
  • Huawei Mate 20 Pro
    3291
  • Sony Xperia XZ3
    2486
  • HTC U12+
    2456
  • Xiaomi Pocophone F1
    2438
  • Xiaomi Mi 8
    2431
  • OnePlus 6T
    2431
  • LG V40 ThinQ
    2408
  • LG G7 ThinQ
    2395
  • Google Pixel 3 XL
    2363
  • Oppo Find X
    2322
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+ (Snapdragon)
    2199

There's a tiny bit more variation between the Snapdragons under multi-core loads, but all of them are plenty powerful, V40 included.

GeekBench 4.1 (multi-core)

Higher is better

  • Huawei Mate 20 Pro
    9712
  • Xiaomi Pocophone F1
    9003
  • HTC U12+
    9001
  • OnePlus 6T
    8977
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+
    8883
  • LG G7 ThinQ
    8865
  • Sony Xperia XZ3
    8607
  • LG V40 ThinQ
    8568
  • Xiaomi Mi 8
    8494
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+ (Snapdragon)
    8349
  • Google Pixel 3 XL
    8088
  • Oppo Find X
    8018

In Antutu, we didn't get quite as many points out of the V40 as we got from the competition - only the Exynos Galaxy S9+ and the Mi 8 are behind. The Pixel 3XL and LG's own G7 are marginally ahead of the V40, while the OnePlus 6T leads the way.

AnTuTu 7

Higher is better

  • OnePlus 6T
    293994
  • Oppo Find X
    291218
  • Sony Xperia XZ3
    284555
  • Huawei Mate 20 Pro
    273913
  • Xiaomi Pocophone F1
    265314
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+ (Snapdragon)
    264044
  • HTC U12+
    263696
  • LG G7 ThinQ
    259393
  • Google Pixel 3 XL
    258244
  • LG V40 ThinQ
    254304
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+
    246660
  • Xiaomi Mi 8
    217298

The V40 has the raw power to ace offscreen graphics benchmarks, but framerates predictably take a hit in onscreen testing. Te more pixels of the QHD display mean FullHD rivals like the Find X and OnePlus 6T will post better numbers, but the V40 is still ahead of the Pixel 3 XL and the Exynos Galaxy.

GFX 3.0 Manhattan (1080p offscreen)

Higher is better

  • LG V40 ThinQ
    83
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+ (Snapdragon)
    83
  • OnePlus 6T
    83
  • Huawei Mate 20 Pro
    83
  • Oppo Find X
    82
  • Xiaomi Pocophone F1
    82
  • Sony Xperia XZ3
    76
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+
    74
  • Google Pixel 3 XL
    72
  • LG G7 ThinQ
    66
  • HTC U12+
    64
  • Xiaomi Mi 8
    64

GFX 3.0 Manhattan (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Xiaomi Pocophone F1
    59
  • OnePlus 6T
    59
  • Oppo Find X
    58
  • Xiaomi Mi 8
    57
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+ (Snapdragon)
    51
  • HTC U12+
    50
  • Huawei Mate 20 Pro
    50
  • LG V40 ThinQ
    46
  • Sony Xperia XZ3
    45
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+
    45
  • LG G7 ThinQ
    43
  • Google Pixel 3 XL
    39

GFX 3.1 Manhattan (1080p offscreen)

Higher is better

  • Samsung Galaxy S9+ (Snapdragon)
    61
  • HTC U12+
    60
  • Oppo Find X
    60
  • Xiaomi Pocophone F1
    60
  • OnePlus 6T
    60
  • LG G7 ThinQ
    57
  • LG V40 ThinQ
    56
  • Sony Xperia XZ3
    56
  • Xiaomi Mi 8
    53
  • Huawei Mate 20 Pro
    53
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+
    47
  • Google Pixel 3 XL
    44

GFX 3.1 Manhattan (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Xiaomi Pocophone F1
    53
  • OnePlus 6T
    53
  • Xiaomi Mi 8
    50
  • Oppo Find X
    50
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+ (Snapdragon)
    34
  • HTC U12+
    33
  • Sony Xperia XZ3
    31
  • LG G7 ThinQ
    30
  • LG V40 ThinQ
    29
  • Huawei Mate 20 Pro
    27
  • Google Pixel 3 XL
    24
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+
    24

All in all, a predictably great showing from the V40 in the performance department, with no significant heat build up or major thermal throttling.

Reader comments

  • mounish

g7 thing process very good game perfomence also very good and very low is price with water proof battery also good

  • Drobo

Does any of the selfie cameras have Auto-Focus or is it Fixed focus (I presume that ultra wide is fixed but I will never know)

  • Medstar1

The LG V40 in my opinion is the best device LG has produced since the V20, which I also own. There are many deals to be found. I purchased a new in the box one from a local seller on Offer Up for a deep discount. The video/audio set up is second to n...